Windows 8 built-in PDF Reader & print options


reader app logoWindows 8 comes to you with some quite useful apps pre-installed, one of which is a native PDF viewer simply called “Reader”… not a terribly imaginative title but a useful app nonetheless. Reader is pretty basic fair but it adequately meets my requirements.

To be honest, I didn’t even know Windows 8 included a default PDF reader until I clicked to open a PDF and up it popped.

PDF’s are opened in the ‘Reader’ app in the usual manner, simply double click the PDF file. Now with the PDF open to view, right click anywhere inside the document and a menu will open across the bottom of the screen with a number of additional (and useful) options:

reader right click options

Clicking on the “More” menu item expands a sub menu which includes several additional options:

reader right click options 2

I decided I’d like a hard copy of a particular PDF and that’s when the fun began; do you think I could find a print option…

After much time spent clicking around Windows 8 with no joy, I finally stumbled across the ‘print’ settings, tucked away behind several menus. So, for those of you who encounter the same conundrum, here is the answer:


  • Activate the “Charms’ bar (by mousing over the top or bottom right hand corner of the screen), and select Devices
  • A “Devices’ menu will now appear. Simply select (click on) your default printer from the list…

reader print option

… and, there it is:

reader print options 2

Okay, now I have a rather embarrassing admission to make; after all that, I discovered that, with the PDF file open, the good old Ctrl + P keyboard shortcut will also bring up a print menu:

reader print options 3

Silly me. I should have considered the obvious first. I actually thought about scrapping this article altogether but I already had some nice screenshots saved and it seemed rather a shame to waste ’em. 🙂

Besides, I did learn something along the way and who knows, it is information which may come in handy one day on another occasion.

Scientia potentia est… (knowledge is power)


About the Author

Jim Hillier

Jim is the resident freeware aficionado at DCT. A computer veteran with 30+ years experience who first started writing about computers and tech back in the days when freeware was actually free. His first computer was a TRS-80 in the 1980s, he progressed through the Commodore series of computers before moving to PCs in the 1990s. Now retired (aka an old geezer), Jim retains his passion for all things tech and still enjoys building and repairing computers for a select clientele... as well as writing for DCT, of course.

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