Geek Facts for October 5th – A Visionary and the IBM ThinkPad


In 2011
, Steve Jobs, the co-founder of Apple, died after a prolonged battle with pancreatic cancer.

Steve Jobs made many significant contributions to the computer industry as well as several others. Many consider personal computing to be launched with the Apple II in 1977. The iPod and iTunes have provided an easy, legal way to distribute and download digital music since the early 2000s. The mobile phone industry was revolutionized with the introduction of the iPhone in 2007. Steve Jobs and Apple pretty much created the tablet industry with the launch of the iPad in 2010. Under his guidance, Apple was transformed from a computer company to a consumer electronics company. In addition, as co-founder of Pixar, Steve Jobs helped to bring a whole new type of animation to fruition. His company, NeXT, developed an operating system that would eventually become Mac OS X.

Learn more at http://www.time.com/time/business/article/0,8599,2096251,00.html.

In 1992
, IBM introduced the IBM ThinkPad line of laptop computers.

The ThinkPad 700 featured a monochrome 9.5-inch display, a 25 MHz 486SLC and 4MB RAM. The ThinkPad 700C featured the 25MHz 486SLC and a 10.3-in TFT active-matrix VGA color. The ThinkPad introduced, or at least helped to popularize, the TrackPoint controller, a tiny joystick built into the keyboard. In 2002, IBM announced that it had sold fifteen million ThinkPads.

Learn more at http://oldcomputers.net/ibm-thinkpad.html.

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About the Author

Judy Novotny

Judy is a computer veteran with 30 years of experience. She has owned everything from a TRS-80, Apple IIe and various Windows-based PCs. She is currently living in her Apple ecosystem at home consisting of an iPhone, iPad, iMac, MacBook, Apple TV, iPod nano and two Time Capsules. She is a fan of all things mobile since she got her first Palm Pilot in 1999. Check out her iPad app, Number Wizard, in the App Store. Follow her on Twitter @junovotech or at Junovo.com.

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