System Boost Elite & Registry Cleaner Free – Beware!!


Our friends over at FreewareBB have again alerted us to two free programs which should be treated with caution. The software in question, System Boost Elite and Registry Cleaner Free, involve several anomalies which cast serious doubts over intent and credibility.

Devious?

Both products are portrayed as separate entities available for download from two distinctly separate sites, and there is no reference on each site to the other product. YET both sites are patently from the same people – they are identical in almost every respect. Why would the owners wish to present their products as seemingly unassociated? One can’t help assuming some sort of ulterior motivation. Furthermore, both sites are rated RED (as in dangerous/unsafe) by the WOT site advisory service.

False Claims?

Each product page includes identical claims of awards emanating from a variety of download sites, yet there is no mention of any such awards on any of the sites named. In fact, at least one of the sites doesn’t even list the software at all.

Malware?


Scanning the downloaded executables through Virus Total elicits one hit for System Boost Elite:

  • NOD32 – a variant of Win32/Adware.RealRegistryCleaner

And 3 hits for Registry Cleaner Free:

  • Comodo – UnclassifiedMalware
  • Emsisoft – Adware.Win32.RealRegistryCleaner.AMN!A2
  • NOD32 – a variant of Win32/Adware.RealRegistryCleaner

Now, under normal circumstances and minus any additional concerns, I would tend to write these off as false positives – after all, 1 flag and 3 flags out of a possible 41 hardly constitutes proof positive. However, given the other dubious factors involved, I see this as just one more reason to avoid this software.

I might add that CNET actually lists System Boost Elite among its downloads – just one more reason why everyone should be using FreewareBB.

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About the Author

Jim Hillier

Jim is the resident freeware aficionado at DCT. A computer veteran with 30+ years experience who first started writing about computers and tech back in the days when freeware was actually free. His first computer was a TRS-80 in the 1980s, he progressed through the Commodore series of computers before moving to PCs in the 1990s. Now retired (aka an old geezer), Jim retains his passion for all things tech and still enjoys building and repairing computers for a select clientele... as well as writing for DCT, of course.

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