Microsoft’s Spartan browser Now Becomes ‘Edge’ – Supports Extensions


Internet Explorer’s more modern and speedier successor, which Microsoft is hoping will take over the world and was previously codenamed “Spartan”, has now officially been given the permanent monicker “Edge”.

spartan browser

Edge maintains Spartan innovations such as page markup, reading view, and Cortana integration. It’s also a Universal Windows app, meaning one application will run on PCs, phones, tablets, and whatever other Windows devices may emerge. However, in the view of many, including myself, the greatest innovation will be its wide support for extensions.

Edge and Extensions

edge-vs-explorer

Extensions have become an almost essential part of user requirements in their Web browsers, and while Internet Explorer has limited extensibility, Edge is set to bring the full-on experience of Firefox and Chrome style extensions.

Edge’s extension developers will use the same JavaScript and HTML standard code used by the two competing browsers for their extensions, meaning that extensions programmed for Chrome or Firefox would only require minimal coding to work in Edge.

I admit I am still an habitual Firefox user, and that’s largely because of my favorite extensions which I would hate to be without. Lack of a viable compehensive extension library has always been one of Internet Explorer’s major failings in competing with both Firefox and Chrome. Edge’s support for popular extensions should see this disparity disappear at least and add a whole lot of appeal to using Microsoft’s new browser.

So, here’s my question to you – if Edge supports all your favorite extensions, would you consider switching?


 

About the Author

Jim Hillier

Jim is the resident freeware aficionado at DCT. A computer veteran with 30+ years experience who first started writing about computers and tech back in the days when freeware was actually free. His first computer was a TRS-80 in the 1980s, he progressed through the Commodore series of computers before moving to PCs in the 1990s. Now retired (aka an old geezer), Jim retains his passion for all things tech and still enjoys building and repairing computers for a select clientele... as well as writing for DCT, of course.

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