Malwarebytes Reinforces its Fight Against PUPs


Malwarebytes Anti-Malware + Junkware Removal Tool = Bad News for PUPs

mbam_plus_JRTWith the recent acquisition of the popular Junkware Removal Tool software, Malwarebytes has added another string to its security bow. Although, I guess it’s really a case of strengthening an existing string rather than adding something new.

Although not sporting a traditional GUI and purely a command line tool, Junkware Removal Tool has proven to be a popular download among those wanting to rid their computers of unwanted crapware. Now, according to a recent press release, Malwarebytes has procured the software as well as the services of the tool’s developer, Filipos Mouliatis.

Junkware Removal Tool is a security utility that searches for and removes common adware, toolbars, and potentially unwanted programs (PUPs) from your computer. With the acquisition of JRT, we are reinforcing how serious we are about potentially unwanted programs which often trick users into getting installed and provide no real value to the end user. <source>

However, Malwarebyes has made it clear that it is not planning to develop the tool further as a standalone software, such as adding a GUI or options to provide better user controls. Instead, the technology will be utilized to enhance existing adware/PUP detection and removal abilities in its flagship product Malwarebytes Anti-Malware:

The developer of the tool, Filipos Mouliatis, joins our research team and will help us integrate the JRT technologies into our mainline Malwarebytes Anti-Malware product.

The blog post goes on to advise that Junkware Removal Tool will remain available to download as a separate entity for the time being – “at least until we’re able to replicate the functionality into Malwarebytes Anti-Malware”.

*PUP = Potentially Unwanted Programs

 

About the Author

Jim Hillier

Jim is the resident freeware aficionado at DCT. A computer veteran with 30+ years experience who first started writing about computers and tech back in the days when freeware was actually free. His first computer was a TRS-80 in the 1980s, he progressed through the Commodore series of computers before moving to PCs in the 1990s. Now retired (aka an old geezer), Jim retains his passion for all things tech and still enjoys building and repairing computers for a select clientele... as well as writing for DCT, of course.

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