Mozilla plans on challenging proprietary app stores


Mozilla’s very existence was founded on the doctrines of open competition. Indeed, its flagship Firefox browser was primarily conceived to provide Windows users with a viable alternative to the dominant yet insecure Internet Explorer. It appears Mozilla is now preparing to apply the principle across web apps.

I believe we can all appreciate the benefits afforded by advancements in mobile technology but there remains a very big sticking point – the proprietary nature of associated apps and app stores. This obvious manipulation of the market place by major players has become Mozilla’s new battleground,  and the mission: to release users from the shackles applied by a “lock-in” system which is spreading across the Internet arena.

Mozilla believes that the Web is the platform and the entire Web should be your marketplace.

We will build a Marketplace for apps that work across desktops, phones and tablets. Through this Marketplace, developers will be able to distribute and monetize their apps. Users will be able to find, install and use their Apps across all of their devices, regardless of the underlying device/OS platforms. This Marketplace will also be a single destination where users can find both cross-platform Apps and Firefox extensions.

Mozilla plans on busting proprietary ecosystems through further development of the established Firefox browser and the underway  ‘Boot To Gecko‘ browser-based operating system for mobile devices, with the projected Mozilla App Store at the heart.

I don’t believe it will be an easy road for Mozilla, taking on the well established front runners. But I do personally wish Mozilla well in their quest – if they do manage to successfully open up an area which has very much become Apples for Apple and Googles for Google, surely it can only be a good thing.

<Mozilla 2012 Roadmaps>

About the Author

Jim Hillier

Jim is the resident freeware aficionado at DCT. A computer veteran with 30+ years experience who first started writing about computers and tech back in the days when freeware was actually free. His first computer was a TRS-80 in the 1980s, he progressed through the Commodore series of computers before moving to PCs in the 1990s. Now retired (aka an old geezer), Jim retains his passion for all things tech and still enjoys building and repairing computers for a select clientele… as well as writing for DCT, of course.