How to burn DVD files using ImgBurn


Assuming you have already created backup files of your DVD which are now stored on the hard drive in a folder named Video_TS.

Insert a blank DVD into the ROM-Drive, open ImgBurn and select the option to Write files/folders to disc. Click on the Mode tab and make sure the Build option is enabled (ticked):

Also, click on the Output tab and make sure output it set to Device:

Now click on the Browse folders button and navigate to the location of the Video_TS folder. Select that folder (highlight it) and then click OK. You will see the location and movie title now appear in the adjacent box:

Click on the Calculator button to ensure that your movie will indeed fit onto a single layer disc. You will then see indicators of space required versus space available, per medium of a usage bar graph plus adjacent percentage:

Now click on the Device tab and select the burning speed. Bear in mind here; slower is better… but we also don’t want to be waiting forever for the burn process to complete. I generally select 8x as a nice compromise between speed and assurance of burn quality:


Now click on the Options tab and make sure ISO9660+UDF is selected in the ‘File System’ drop down box. This should be selected by default but best to double check it:

Now click on the Labels tab and type the name of movie into the dialogue box labeled ISO9660:. Copy the identical label into the UDF field by clicking on the icon (as identified by the red arrow):

Now all that’s left to do is click on the Build button. You can also place a checkmark in the Verify box if you wish to enable that option (takes a little longer but verifies burnt data matches that of source files):

That’s it folks, now go make a cup of coffee (or whatever) while your disc is burning.

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About the Author

Jim Hillier

Jim is the resident freeware aficionado at DCT. A computer veteran with 30+ years experience who first started writing about computers and tech back in the days when freeware was actually free. His first computer was a TRS-80 in the 1980s, he progressed through the Commodore series of computers before moving to PCs in the 1990s. Now retired (aka an old geezer), Jim retains his passion for all things tech and still enjoys building and repairing computers for a select clientele... as well as writing for DCT, of course.