OneLook: Search more than 1000 dictionaries all in one place


Here is another online service which, in my humble opinion, is well worth bookmarking. It’s called ‘OneLook Dictionary Search‘ and, as the name suggests, the service utilizes results from multiple online dictionaries…  1062 to be exact.

onelook dictionary search - home page

There is no shortage of online dictionaries available and many of us would already have selected a favorite. I actually have the free WordWeb installed locally and have utilized a selection of online alternatives in the past. However, to the best of knowledge, OneLook is the only such service which pulls its results from multiple resources. Here is the result of a OneLook definitions search for a “fair dinkum” Aussie saying:

onelook - search results

OneLook Reverse Dictionary Search

Now for the pièce de résistance… reverse dictionary search!

onelook - reverse dic.

One of the worst aspects of growing older, apart from the obvious, is the diminishing capacity for quick recall. The information is still there, but now it often takes ages to dig it up from deep within the crevices of the overloaded gray matter…. enter OneLook Reverse Dictionary Search. Just pop in a short phrase describing a concept and OneLook will give you the answer. For example; can’t remember what a barrel maker is called? Just type “barrel maker” into OneLook’s reverse dictionary search and… voila!

onelook - barrel maker

As you can see from the screenshot above, OneLook’s reverse dictionary search includes several very useful functions for young and old alike: To help school aged children with their projects and assignments perhaps. For writers of all ages. And for “cruciverbalists” … that’s a crossword puzzle enthusiast by the way … I looked it up on OneLook. 🙂

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About the Author

Jim Hillier

Jim is the resident freeware aficionado at DCT. A computer veteran with 30+ years experience who first started writing about computers and tech back in the days when freeware was actually free. His first computer was a TRS-80 in the 1980s, he progressed through the Commodore series of computers before moving to PCs in the 1990s. Now retired (aka an old geezer), Jim retains his passion for all things tech and still enjoys building and repairing computers for a select clientele... as well as writing for DCT, of course.

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