TimeFreeze: easily create a secure virtual environment


Toolwiz Software is a relative newcomer to the ranks of freeware development and distribution but Toolwiz’s portfolio already includes an impressive range of free tools and utilities – you can view a list of all available titles including summarized descriptions for each HERE.

The one that particularly caught my eye is Toolwiz TimeFreeze, a free program which provides users with a safe, secure virtual environment in which to work:

Toolwiz TimeFreeze is a free instant solution to keep your system safe and always like new.  It protects your system from any unwanted changes and malicious activity in low disk level.

With a simple click,  it puts your actual system under virtual protection on the fly and creates a virtual environment on which you can evaluate applications, watch movies, and perform online activities.

Considering I am continually testing and evaluating all types of software, I just had to take TimeFreeze for a test drive. The first thing I did was scan the setup file through Virus Total, not because of any suspicions at all, just because that is always a wise precaution when evaluating any software which has not yet established a firm reputation – Virus Total scanned the file 100% clean.

Installation was quick and uneventful without any nasty surprises, the only aspect worth mentioning is that it requires a restart to complete. TimeFreeze itself is very easy to use and, more importantly, extremely effective. Initiating the software opens up a plain, simple interface with two main options; ‘Start TimeFreeze’ and ‘Start File Protection’:

Starting TimeFreeze is obviously the main function but the secondary file protection feature is an interesting and very useful addition which can be utilized to protect user designated files/folders against unwanted or accidental changes. Also included is an option to password protect access to the TimeFreeze program and options, so only the original user can disable the protection.

Clicking on the ‘Start TimeFreeze’ button initiates a precautionary message, similar to the ones which are forever popping up in Windows – “Are you sure you want to do that”. One click on the confirmation button and that’s it – no further interaction is required and you are now working in a virtual environment.


TimeFreeze places an icon in the notification area of the Taskbar which provides access to information about the program’s status, plus options to start and stop features:

                              

Once you have completed your assignment and no longer wish to continue working in the TimeFreeze virtual environment, simply right click the tray icon and select Stop TimeFreeze. A new window will then pop up with options to either save or discard any changes made:

By way of testing TimeFreeze’s efficacy; the last three screenshots included in this article were all captured inside the TimeFreeze virtual environment. I saved them to my ‘Pictures’ folder and placed a copy of each on an external hard drive so they’d still be available to use later (I’m no ordinary fool). I then selected the option to ‘Stop TimeFreeze’ and discard all changes, which prompted a system restart. Once fully re-booted I checked my ‘Pictures’ folder and sure enough the original images were gone.

The verdict: TimeFreeze is a definite keeper, it may not be exactly loaded with options but, for me anyway, that elementary approach is a huge part of the overall appeal. The rare combination of simplicity and total efficacy makes TimeFreeze an easy recommendation and eminently suitable for all users, regardless of levels of proficiency. TimeFreeze can be summed up perfectly in just two words – simply brilliant!

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About the Author

Jim Hillier

Jim is the resident freeware aficionado at DCT. A computer veteran with 30+ years experience who first started writing about computers and tech back in the days when freeware was actually free. His first computer was a TRS-80 in the 1980s, he progressed through the Commodore series of computers before moving to PCs in the 1990s. Now retired (aka an old geezer), Jim retains his passion for all things tech and still enjoys building and repairing computers for a select clientele… as well as writing for DCT, of course.

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