Google Set to Retire Picasa


Google has announced that it will be shutting down its Picasa Web Albums service on 1st May, 2016 and no longer supporting the Picasa desktop application as of 15th May, 2016.

Picasa_Logo

Picasa Web Albums

It’s been almost 12 months since Google launched its new “Google Photos” service and the decision to drop Picasa online in favor of Google Photos really comes as no great surprise. According to Google; those currently using the Picasa Web Albums service can easily transition to Google Photos:

If you have photos or videos in a Picasa Web Album today, the easiest way to still access, modify and share most of that content is to log in to Google Photos, and all your photos and videos will already be there.

However, Picasa Web Albums users who’d prefer not to use Google Photos will have to wait for a bit:

For those of you who don’t want to use Google Photos or who still want to be able to view specific content, such as tags, captions or comments, we will be creating a new place for you to access your Picasa Web Albums data. That way, you will still be able to view, download, or delete your Picasa Web Albums, you just won’t be able to create, organize or edit albums.

Picasa Desktop Application

Even though Google will no longer be supporting Picasa desktop after 15th May, it will still work perfectly for existing users. It just means that there will be no new versions or new features available.

As of March 15, 2016, we will no longer be supporting the Picasa desktop application. For those who have already downloaded this—or choose to do so before this date—it will continue to work as it does today, but we will not be developing it further, and there will be no future updates.

 

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About the Author

Jim Hillier

Jim is the resident freeware aficionado at DCT. A computer veteran with 30+ years experience who first started writing about computers and tech back in the days when freeware was actually free. His first computer was a TRS-80 in the 1980s, he progressed through the Commodore series of computers before moving to PCs in the 1990s. Now retired (aka an old geezer), Jim retains his passion for all things tech and still enjoys building and repairing computers for a select clientele... as well as writing for DCT, of course.

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