Edge Browser Tips – Settings and Customizations


“Edge” is the name of Microsoft’s new browser which comes shipped with Windows 10 and it’s lightweight and very snappy. What follows is a number of tips to help get you started with Edge:

Accessing the Settings menu in Edge

The Settings menu in Edge is quite comprehensive and, to a certain extent, allows you to customize the browser to your own liking. You access the settings menu by simply clicking the three horizontal dots at the far right of the top menu:

edge-access settings

Change Themes in Edge

From here you can choose the way Edge displays. Unfortunately, choices are limited to either Light or Dark:

edge-choose theme

edge-dark theme

Import Favorites into Edge

You can also import favorites into Edge but only from another browser installed in Windows 10:

edge-import favorites

Unfortunately, at this point in time, there appears to be no way to import favorites from an HTML file. However, if you’ve previously saved your favorites (or bookmarks) to an HTML file on external media, you can then import that HTML file into Internet Explorer in Windows 10 and from there import into Edge.

Delete Browsing History (Data) In Edge

You can quite easily delete browsing history (data) in Edge at any time. Access the Settings menu and, under “Clear browsing data “, click the Choose what to clear button:


edge settings-clear browsing data

You’ll then be presented with a list of options. Checkmark those areas you wish to include for deletion and then click the Clear button:

edge-clear data options

Change Default Search Engine in Edge

The search engine in Edge is set to Bing by default (surprise!) but it’s very easy to change. Each time you visit a search engine page, Edge records it and adds the search engine to a list of options. For example; if you want to make Google your default search engine, simply visit the Google search page and it will automatically be added to your list of alternatives.

From there; access the Settings menu, scroll down and click on the View advanced settings button:

edge-advanced settings2

Look down the list of advanced settings and locate “Search in the address bar with”. Open the associated drop down menu and click <Add New>:

edge-add new search engine 1

This will open a list of search engine pages you’ve visited along with options to manage them:


edge-manage search engines

As you can see from the above screenshot, I’d already visited both Google Australia and Duck Duck Go and can now add either as my default search provider.

More Advanced Settings in Edge

Also under the Advanced Settings menu you can:

  • Enable or disable Flash Player
  • Opt to use Caret browsing
  • Set Privacy options
  • Manage Saved passwords – not recommended as there is no master password protection (at least, none that I could find)
  • Opt to save form entries
  • Choose to block pop-ups and Cookies
  • Send Do Not Track requests
  • Use Page prediction
  • Enable or disable SmartScreen Filter
  • Turn Cortana integration On or Off

These then are just some of the main customizations available from within Edge’s Settings and Advanced Settings menus. It’s a fairly comprehensive selection overall and well worth going through.

Edge Extensions

Microsoft has promised that extensions will be available for the Edge browser but at this stage there is no word on when this might eventuate. I performed a cursory search for Edge extensions and found no such animals nor any information regarding a possible time frame. If Microsoft is serious about Edge competing with the likes of Chrome and Firefox, this is an area where the company really needs to get cracking, a browser just isn’t a proper browser without our favorite extensions. 🙂

 

About the Author

Jim Hillier

Jim is the resident freeware aficionado at DCT. A computer veteran with 30+ years experience who first started writing about computers and tech back in the days when freeware was actually free. His first computer was a TRS-80 in the 1980s, he progressed through the Commodore series of computers before moving to PCs in the 1990s. Now retired (aka an old geezer), Jim retains his passion for all things tech and still enjoys building and repairing computers for a select clientele... as well as writing for DCT, of course.

There are 2 comments

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *