Windows 10: Spartan Browser with Cortana Integration (video)


If you haven’t heard by now, Microsoft’s new upcoming and highly anticipated operating system, Windows 10, will come with a brand new browser codenamed “Spartan”.

spartan browserWindows 10 will still ship with Internet Explorer “for legacy reasons” but Microsoft is keen to let everyone know that Spartan will be the next big thing. As the codename suggests, the new browser is obviously designed to be minimal:

  • bare-bones, plain, simple, clean ~ synonyms for Spartan from Thesuarus.com

Another new feature in Windows 10 will be “Cortana”, an artificial intelligence-based personal assistant along the lines of Siri for Apple, and named after a fictional character in the Halo video game series. Put the two together, Spartan + Cortana, and the result is a simple yet highly intuitive browsing experience.

Cortana

The best way to describe it is that Cortana is your surfing companion, accompanying you wherever you go – when you open up a web page, Cortana will pull additional information based on the page’s content and display same, on demand, in her sidebar, which is normally hidden at the right side of the browser window by default.

One of the main benefits of Cortana’s integration is that you won’t necessarily need to leave the current web page for such things as looking up the meaning of a word or identifying a particular geographical location. Just highlight and right click any word or phrase included within the page, choose “Ask Cortana” and that additional information will then be presented in her sidebar.

Will Internet Explorer also come with Cortana integrated? I seriously doubt it. Microsoft will no doubt see a ‘Spartan only’ approach as an inducement to wean users off the old browser and onto the new. Plus, those privacy-minded users who may not appreciate Cortana surfing along with them, will still have the Internet Explorer route as an option.


<source – WinBeta>

 

About the Author

Jim Hillier

Jim is the resident freeware aficionado at DCT. A computer veteran with 30+ years experience who first started writing about computers and tech back in the days when freeware was actually free. His first computer was a TRS-80 in the 1980s, he progressed through the Commodore series of computers before moving to PCs in the 1990s. Now retired (aka an old geezer), Jim retains his passion for all things tech and still enjoys building and repairing computers for a select clientele... as well as writing for DCT, of course.

There is one comment

Comments are closed.