New Revo Uninstaller Free Now Supports 64-bit Applications


Revo Uninstaller has long been regarded as one of the best third party uninstallers available. However, the free version has always suffered from lack of support for removing 64-bit applications (which has previously only been available in the Pro version). Good news; this has all changed with the release of the latest Revo Uninstaller free edition (2.0.0) which comes with a new look interface and full support for removing 64-bit as well as 32-bit applications.

Here is the interface for the older Revo portable free edition (v1.95):

revo free-v1.95 interface2

Click image to view full size

And here is the interface for the new Revo portable free edition (2.0.0):

Click image to view full size

Click image to view full size

At the bottom left of each interface you’ll see where I’ve highlighted the total number of installed programs listed – 30 in the older version and 44 in the new version. The difference being, of course, the addition of the 64-bit programs.

And if we switch to “Details” view you can see the 64-bit programs clearly identified:

Click image to view full size

Click image to view full size

Revo Uninstaller free 2.0.0 still retains its collection of useful tools but with added support for cleaning more browsers – previously only Internet Explorer and Opera, now with Firefox and Chrome included as well.


Revo has always been a popular free third party uninstaller but, with the increased availability of 64-bit applications, I’m pretty sure many users, myself included, have switched to the the portable Geek Uninstaller free edition simply because of its full support for 64-bit applications. This latest version of Revo brings the excellent free uninstaller into the 21st century and should also see it right back in the spotlight.

About the Author

Jim Hillier

Jim is the resident freeware aficionado at DCT. A computer veteran with 30+ years experience who first started writing about computers and tech back in the days when freeware was actually free. His first computer was a TRS-80 in the 1980s, he progressed through the Commodore series of computers before moving to PCs in the 1990s. Now retired (aka an old geezer), Jim retains his passion for all things tech and still enjoys building and repairing computers for a select clientele... as well as writing for DCT, of course.

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