Microsoft Announces Various Windows 10 Editions


feature-windows 10In a recent blog announcement, Microsoft has finally revealed its range of editions for Windows 10. As far as home users are concerned, Windows 10 will ship in three separate consumer versions; Home, Pro, and Mobile.

With three separate editions available for enterprise.

According to the announcement:

Windows 10 Home is the equivalent of Windows 8/8.1, a consumer-based edition of Windows 10 that will most likely come pre-installed on the majority of new devices. The Home edition will include Cortana, the personal digital assistant; the new Microsoft Edge web browser; Continuum tablet mode for touch-capable devices; and Windows Hello face-recognition, iris and fingerprint login.

Windows 10 Pro includes all the features of Home plus additional professional/business orientated features. At this stage, Microsoft has not provided a full comparison of features between Home and Pro. However, if Windows 8/8.1 is anything to go by, the Home edition will likely lack features such as Group Policy, BitLocker Encryption, and Remote Desktop Connection.


Windows 10 Mobile, as the name suggests, is specifically designed for smaller, mobile, touch-centric devices such as smartphones and small tablets. It boasts the same, new universal Windows apps that are included in Windows 10 Home, as well as the new touch-optimized version of Office.

Windows 10 will also ship in three enterprise editions – Windows 10 Enterprise, Windows 10 Education, and Windows 10 Mobile Enterprise.

Upgrading to Windows 10

windows_upgrade

Microsoft’s announcement also includes confirmation of the free upgrade:

As we announced earlier this year, for the first time ever, we are offering the full versions of Windows 10 Home, Windows 10 Mobile and Windows 10 Pro as a free and easy upgrade for qualifying Windows 7, Windows 8.1 and Windows Phone 8.1 devices that upgrade in the first year after launch.** Once you upgrade, you have Windows 10 for free on that device

At this stage it remains unclear exactly how the upgrade process will work between editions but, if history is anything to go by, it will likely be existing edition to like edition:

  • Windows 7 Home editions —–> Windows 10 Home
  • Windows 7 Pro & Ultimate editions —–> Windows 10 Pro
  • Windows 8/8.1 —–> Windows 10 Home
  • Windows 8/8.1 Pro —–> Windows 10 Pro

I must say, I’m a bit disappointed Microsoft hasn’t taken this opportunity to merge Home and Pro into a single consumer orientated Windows 10 and, in the process, put a stop to all the confusion.


 

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About the Author

Jim Hillier

Jim is the resident freeware aficionado at DCT. A computer veteran with 30+ years experience who first started writing about computers and tech back in the days when freeware was actually free. His first computer was a TRS-80 in the 1980s, he progressed through the Commodore series of computers before moving to PCs in the 1990s. Now retired (aka an old geezer), Jim retains his passion for all things tech and still enjoys building and repairing computers for a select clientele... as well as writing for DCT, of course.

14 Comments

  1. good thing there’s a desktop mode and tablet mode in windows 10 home. can’t wait to try this!

  2. I bought a HP high end for the time PC reasonably cheaper as win 8 had arrived from major retail – i7.. 16 gig Ram – coming from 2 gig Ram and integrated graphics – photoshop had dramas with that set up – goes like a rocket all cleaned up – i guess sooner or later yes – but it is worth the wait to see the reaction – the win 8 hatefest was something to behold

  3. Will the Windows 10 free upgrade be just an upgrade over the top of you current version of Windows or will it be able to be used as a clean install.

    • Yes, the free upgrade will need to installed over the top of a genuine Windows 7, 8, or 8.1. You will not be able to use it for a clean install.

  4. For a power user like myself, I wonder how the “free” upgrade process will carry over after the 1st year expires and you have to reinstall Windows 8 > Windows 8.1 > Windows 10 after completing a major upgrade such as a new motherboard, etc. Will Microsoft issue you an upgrade key you simply reuse or will there be a hassle?

    • That, Rodney, is the million dollar question.

      The upgrade from Win 8 to 8.1 was a compete shambles. I’m hoping that a separate Windows 10 product key will be applied and made readily available/accessible, along with a downloadable ISO, for any such circumstances.

      Of course, the sort of situation you refer to can be overcome by simply maintaining regular full system image backups. 🙂

      • I can agree although I’d prefer a clean install if I’m doing a platform overhaul so I don’t have to worry about removing previous drivers for old hardware. The days of XP and system crashes from installing/removing old hardware is thankfully over. If Windows 10 further improves compatibility with more hardware configs that may very well not be a problem to worry about any longer.

  5. I’d like to upgrade from Windows 7 Home Premium to Windows 10 Pro. Would that be possible, even if there is a cost?

  6. if the upgrade from 7Pro to 10Pro is free. Are all future updates going to be free? Are there going to be any other costs involved just to keep up 10Pro ? Havn’t been able to confirm anywhere.

    • Are all future updates going to be free?

      According to MS, yes.

      Are there going to be any other costs involved just to keep up 10Pro ?

      Again according to MS, no.

      Microsoft has clearly stated that all eligible Windows 10 upgrades performed in the first year following initial release will be free with no future payments required.

  7. Also disappointed that Vista wasn’t considered for the upgrade to 10. Considering all the bad press that Vista has gotten over the years it would’ve been a nice gesture.

    • Disappointing and somewhat surprising Dan that MS didn’t see fit to include Vista. After all, Vista was their mistake.

      A missed PR opportunity methinks.

      • Vista was the only OS from Microsoft that I wanted to throw out the window with the exception of good ole ME.