Leading Credit Bureau Selling Personal Data to ID Thieves


identitytheft

The following is an excerpt from an article recently published by leading security expert Brian Krebs on his KrebsOnSecurity blog. The article shows how the system can be corrupted, revealing the intricacies involved with data sharing and how easily your personal data can end up in the wrong hands:

 

An identity theft service that sold Social Security and drivers license numbers — as well as bank account and credit card data on millions of Americans — purchased much of its data from Experian, one of the three major credit bureaus, according to a lengthy investigation by KrebsOnSecurity.

In November 2011, this publication ran a story about an underground service called Superget.info, a fraudster-friendly site that marketed the ability to look up full Social Security numbers, birthdays, drivers license records and financial information on millions of Americans. Registration was free, and accounts were funded via WebMoney and other virtual currencies that are popular in the cybercriminal underground.

Each SSN search on Superget.info returned consumer records that were marked with a set of varying and mysterious two- and three-letter “sourceid:” identifiers, including “TH,” “MV,” and “NCO,” among others. I asked readers who may have a clue about the meaning or source of those abbreviations to contact me. In the weeks following that post, I heard from many readers who had guesses and ideas, but none who seemed to have conclusive information.

That changed in the past week…

You can read the rest of Brian’s enlightening article in full here: Experian Sold Consumer Data to ID Theft Service.

Highly recommended.

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About the Author

Brian Krebs

Brian became a world renowned security researcher while working for The Washington Post from 1995 to 2009 as the author of The Security Fix column. Since leaving The Washington Post in 2009 Brian has continued his research at Krebs on Security where he continues to investigate cyber criminal gangs, skimmers, software exploits, and the dark underbelly of the web .

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