Java Exploits-Beware-How to disable them!


Joh GuerinDo we really know what security is? Is it freedom from all our worries, or just a pipe dream? Security can mean many things to many people, but when it comes to computers, what do you think it means? Does it mean never having an issue, or can it mean something more down to earth for all of us in the ever changing computer landscape?

Really, I think ‘Security’ means that we should have a good grip on what it takes to keep tabs on all areas of online activity which could be negatively affected. Over the next period of time, I will be presenting articles to help everyday users get a handle on what it means to be more secure with their online life. I come from a good IT background and find my passion to be computers and helping people, so bear with me, as this is my first time writing on a blog site…

 

For starters, let’s take a look at Java and the security issues it raises:

Java logo

What is Java?  It is a web application program described in the following blurb:

Java is the foundation for virtually every type of networked application and is the global standard for developing and delivering mobile applications, games, Web-based content, and enterprise software. With more than 9 million developers worldwide, Java enables you to efficiently develop, deploy and use exciting applications and services.”  What this means to you is to be very prudent to avoid these exploits, keep your guard up!  Java is used a lot in client-server web applications and can run virtually anywhere, which is called write once-run anywhere.

Java has been in the news lately with its ongoing zero day issues, which means that the exploit problems come faster than updates to security can be written.  Oracle, who handles Java, has stepped up its patches, but I would suggest users be very wary and disable it as shown in the link below!

FireEye, a security firm, urges users to apply the following:


Since this exploit affects the latest Java 6u41 and Java 7u15 versions, we urge users to disable Java in your browser until a patch has been released; alternatively, set your Java security settings to ‘High’ and do not execute any unknown Java applets outside of your organization.

Here is a link to help you disable Java:  http://disablejava.com/#howto

You can follow the suggestions to disable Java – highly recommended. Or, if you just cannot get by without Java, download the latest update – not recommended.

Until Oracle can get this problem in hand, it is best to disable Java till you hear otherwise!

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About the Author

John Guerin

John is a retired US Army Contractor who served as a Senior Desktop Support Administrator. He currently runs his own computer repair and support business after spending many years working for several of the largest, and most well known, corporations in the world. His interests include his grandchildren, travel, walking, cultural events, fixing things, and helping others.

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