How To Customize Command Prompt


*Applies to Windows 7/8.1/10 – this tutorial explains the steps in Windows 10 but it is very similar in Windows 7 and 8.1.

We’ve seen lots of appearance changes and innovations introduced with each new Windows operating system but one thing has remained constant throughout, Command Prompt. The basic black and white design has been carried on through each Windows iteration and, while it’s not something users would run very often, it wouldn’t hurt to “cool” it up somewhat. Command Prompt’s default font size can often make the text difficult to read too, but this can all quite easily be changed:

command prompt-default1

From this

command prompt-custom

To something like this

Here’s How: Right click in Command Prompt’s title bar and select Properties:

command prompt-properties

This will open up a Properties windows with 4 tabs across the top – the three we are most interested in are the Font, Layout, and Colours tabs. Under the Font tab you can change the size and style of the text as well as making it display in bold. Very handy for those of us whose eyesight isn’t what it used to be:

command prompt-font tab

Under the Colours tab you can change the background colour and text colour, as well as a few other less significant changes:

command prompt-colours tab2

Simply select the item you want to change (such as Screen Background) and then click on a colour from the colours bar:


The Layout tab allows users to set a new default window display size and screen position:

command prompt-layout tab

Just increase the “Width” and “Height” values to make the Command Prompt window display larger. When you’ve finished customizing, instead of squinting at the rather small and mundane default Command Prompt, you’ll end up with something like this:

command prompt-customized2

Way more cool, but most importantly, a heck of a lot easier to read.

 

About the Author

Jim Hillier

Jim is the resident freeware aficionado at DCT. A computer veteran with 30+ years experience who first started writing about computers and tech back in the days when freeware was actually free. His first computer was a TRS-80 in the 1980s, he progressed through the Commodore series of computers before moving to PCs in the 1990s. Now retired (aka an old geezer), Jim retains his passion for all things tech and still enjoys building and repairing computers for a select clientele... as well as writing for DCT, of course.

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