HD Cloning | Page 2

Avatar

Please consider registering
Guest

Search

— Forum Scope —






— Match —





— Forum Options —





Minimum search word length is 3 characters - maximum search word length is 84 characters

Register Lost password?
sp_Feed sp_topic_old
HD Cloning
Avatar
Jim Hillier
Admin
Forum Posts: 2509
Member Since:
August 9, 2011
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
16
May 22, 2014 - 3:54 am
sp_Permalink sp_Print sp_EditHistory

From what I can make out this option will clone directly to another mechanical drive without requiring the middle step of writing an "image" to a USB drive
Is that correct?

Yes, that is 100% correct.

The only problem with that method is; if you clone the drive now and then put the drive away for future use, when the time comes to replace the old drive, the information/data on the new drive will be from when you first cloned it. So, if you cloned today and then the hard drive failed in say 12 months, the operating system and all your data would be 12 months out of date.

What you would need to do is clone the drive again every month or two so the operating system and data will be kept as up to date as possible.

to perform a Image copy I guess that option that this software offers is either very hard to find from within the menu or it does not exist or it lies somewhere within the "Backup" option?

When you run Aomei Backupper, click the Backup option and then select "System Backup". Have a read here: https://davescomputertips.com/aomei-backupper-free-imaging-test-review/

Avatar
Colin B
Member
Forum Posts: 43
Member Since:
February 23, 2014
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
17
May 22, 2014 - 9:37 pm
sp_Permalink sp_Print sp_EditHistory

Hi Jim,
What patience you must have !
I'm shying away from those "I've got it" and those "this is my final question" texts.

I noticed in your link to your review that one of those three steps you talk about include creating a "bootable media" Does this have to be done before imaging?
What does this bootable media have to do with backup-ing?

Hmm I can see now how beginners, such as me, are the ones who never backup., clone or image!
The instructions and terms are Ok for guys like you and probably most of your readers but oh boy it is really confusing.
That's with every software solution that I've read, not just the one you have linked to.
Terms like System Image and Clone and Backup seem to be used almost for each other and seem to span across instructions without explanation.
System Image as such does not have a seperate menu entry in the free version?..as it's hidden away under another term and the explanations of terms are sometimes contradictory and even hidden away.
The important bit, restoring from one of these options is also vague and skipped over. Well it is to me anyway!

Some say that cloning alone will mean re authorizing Windows and GPU drivers etc. Others say no to that.
There is nowhere that I can see in the cloning instructions about the disk that you clone to. Must it be a mechanical one or can one use a USB "stick" and if necc. copy that to a mechanical drive later?

I guess what I'm trying to say is that absolute beginners in this sort of stuff seem to require a different set of instructions that do not just assume knowledge of terms which roll of the pro's lips with great ease.
But Groups and Forums like this one certainly whet the appetite and many thanks for that alone...Oh and for the answers of course !
Cheers,
Colin

Avatar
Jim Hillier
Admin
Forum Posts: 2509
Member Since:
August 9, 2011
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
18
May 22, 2014 - 10:18 pm
sp_Permalink sp_Print sp_EditHistory

I noticed in your link to your review that one of those three steps you talk about include creating a "bootable media" Does this have to be done before imaging?
What does this bootable media have to do with backup-ing?

I like that word Colin - "backup-ing". Most of us would say "backing up", but I like your version better. https://davescomputertips.com/wp-includes/images/smilies/icon_smile.gif

The bootable media has nothing whatsoever to do with creating the image but is an integral part of restoring the image. Imagine you can't boot your operating system, it will not load. How then would you access the installed imaging software so you could restore an image. You couldn't, if the operating system won't load then you also have zero access to any installed programs. That's where the bootable media (or recovery media) comes in. You can boot the recovery disc or USB device and restore an image to the "C" drive, recovering your system to a working state.

There is nowhere that I can see in the cloning instructions about the disk that you clone to. Must it be a mechanical one or can one use a USB "stick" and if necc. copy that to a mechanical drive later?

Cloning is specifically designed for hard drive to hard drive direct, and no, one cannot use a USB stick and copy to hard drive later.

Cloning is considered more of an immediate solution. When you want to transfer an operating system to a new hard drive immediately. Imaging is more of a looking forward solution, primarily an insurance against disaster, such as hard drive failure or a badly broken operating system.

I agree entirely that some of the terminology is confusing Colin - backup, imaging, cloning, differential, incremental - it can be difficult to get a handle on it all. Here's some more reading that might help: https://davescomputertips.com/backup-vs-imaging-whats-the-difference/

Actually Colin, I think it's brilliant that you are prepared to give it a go and learn. Good on you mate!

Avatar
Colin B
Member
Forum Posts: 43
Member Since:
February 23, 2014
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
19
May 25, 2014 - 7:08 pm
sp_Permalink sp_Print

I'm back again after a sunny weekend and YES ! I have created an Image too.
Thanks, Jim for the info on "Bootable media"
I noticed when reading your : https://davescomputertips.com/aomei-backupper-free-imaging-test-review/ ....that you forgot (?) to mention that in your "Restore" bit.
Most folk would of course have known about "boots that boot themselves..
I guess it stands out in an obvious way but I would not have realised that one must always create this Bootable media in order to start(?) the computer.

Tell me, Jim....When purchasing a new HD on which to place the Image..does it need to be Formatted or anything?
I at least know how to change the whats-its-name so's to be able to boot from CD or USB.
Not completely useless !!
Thanks for your encouraging words too, Jim.
Cheers, Colin

Avatar
Jim Hillier
Admin
Forum Posts: 2509
Member Since:
August 9, 2011
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
20
May 26, 2014 - 8:42 pm
sp_Permalink sp_Print

When purchasing a new HD on which to place the Image..does it need to be Formatted or anything

New drives normally come pre-formated so there is no need to format. You may need to "initialize" the drive and allocate a drive letter.

Cheers... Jim

Avatar
Colin B
Member
Forum Posts: 43
Member Since:
February 23, 2014
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
21
May 27, 2014 - 12:48 am
sp_Permalink sp_Print

"Initialize"..?
Is that a very obvious step and maybe even obvious to me?
Is it done from within the Backupper program?

Sorry about the length of this thread. Folk are probably getting sick and tired of it.
My apologies...but before I depart, this Linux thing. I noticed you mentioned you used the Linux option when creating the bootable media. Is there a reason for this or just a personal choices?
Sounds silly but does it make any difference to use a CD rather than a DVD to write the bootable media to?
Are those CDRW discs any better or worse than the write once type?
Is it wise to store only one Image on the USB drive or can one "fill it up" with images and backups?
Would it hurt to store both the bootable stuff and the Image on the same USB?
Who will win the "State of Origin" Rugby league game?
Cheers to you, Jim.
I think that's it...
Colin

Avatar
Jim Hillier
Admin
Forum Posts: 2509
Member Since:
August 9, 2011
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
22
May 27, 2014 - 2:47 am
sp_Permalink sp_Print sp_EditHistory

"Initialize"..?
Is that a very obvious step and maybe even obvious to me?
Is it done from within the Backupper program?

No, it's done from within Windows, in Disk Management. I wouldn't worry about it Colin, it may not even be necessary, most of the time you just connect the drive and it's good to go. We'll cross that bridge if and when we get to it.

I noticed you mentioned you used the Linux option when creating the bootable media. Is there a reason for this or just a personal choices?

There are generally two options available, Linux based or Win PE. The former is quicker, easier, and will do everything you need. The latter is more complicated and often involves an additional large download. Don't worry about it being Linux based, it comes with a user interface which is just like Windows and very easy to use.

Sounds silly but does it make any difference to use a CD rather than a DVD to write the bootable media to?
Are those CDRW discs any better or worse than the write once type?

CD or DVD it doesn't really matter. It's not a big program so will fit comfortably on a CD, a DVD would be overkill, that's all. I would not recommend using a rewritable CD (CD-RW), much better to use a write once type. The write once only type are more reliable and enjoy wider compatibility.

Is it wise to store only one Image on the USB drive or can one "fill it up" with images and backups?

You can fill it up with anything you like. On mine, I created a folder called "Win 7 Images" which currently holds two images taking up around 60 gigs, the rest of the used space (around 140 gigs) consists of backups of my personal data; photos. documents, videos, music, etc.

Would it hurt to store both the bootable stuff and the Image on the same USB?

The "bootable stuff" must on a drive or disc all on it's own. If you create a bootable USB flash drive, you should NOT use it for anything else.

Who will win the "State of Origin" Rugby league game?

LOL. I wish I knew! My heart says Blues, but my head says Queensland. What's your bet?

And do not worry about the length of this thread mate, anybody who comes along here will be glad to see all the information, it's all good!

Cheers... Jim

Avatar
Colin B
Member
Forum Posts: 43
Member Since:
February 23, 2014
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
23
May 28, 2014 - 8:50 pm
sp_Permalink sp_Print

Hi Jim,
The Heart wins for you. Maybe the Head next time !

Ta for that info. Interesting about using CD-R and not CD-RW.
Guess who went to town and returned with a box of CD-RWs.
Yep,me.
Still no worries, next time I'll get the other sort.

Is it best to do this operation whilst still connected to the Net, or should one disconnect?

I won't say "finally"...but...On the subject of cloning. I have noticed that Dick Smith sells an enclosure/adapter that permits one to place in it a "normal" HD.
Apparently this then allows one to use this proper mechanical HD as a USB3 device.
Now then, could one Clone to this HD using the USB enclosure and then remove the HD from the enclosure.
Would the HD be usable as a Clone by the system..obviously it would be used from within the computer and not with the USB enclosure or adapter..whatever it's correct name is..
It would seem to be an easier way to Clone. (not necc. to open the computer case and find where to plug in that extra drive !!
Thanks again, Colin

Avatar
Jim Hillier
Admin
Forum Posts: 2509
Member Since:
August 9, 2011
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
24
May 29, 2014 - 8:08 pm
sp_Permalink sp_Print sp_EditHistory

Go the Blues!!!!!!!!!

Is it best to do this operation whilst still connected to the Net, or should one disconnect?

Makes no difference either way Colin.

could one Clone to this HD using the USB enclosure and then remove the HD from the enclosure. Would the HD be usable as a Clone by the system

Sure, no problem. Would be a good way to go.

You do seem to be stuck on the cloning scenario Colin, that's not an issue but you need to be aware that cloning is meant more as an immediate method of migration. If what you are seeking is a backup to restore your system following a disaster, then imaging would be the better proposition. Either method will achieve the same end result but imaging is a lot less time consuming, and a number of images can be stored on a single external drive. On the other hand, cloning takes a lot longer and involves the entire drive every time.

Avatar
Colin B
Member
Forum Posts: 43
Member Since:
February 23, 2014
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
25
May 29, 2014 - 8:21 pm
sp_Permalink sp_Print

Guess what?
It worked!
Thanks Jim.
I now have an Image on a USB . A mean green kickstarting bootable cdR..yay!
And what's even better a new HD that works !! I had to try it, Jim.
I'll rewrite a new image every month
May I offer my sincere thanks to you, Jim.
It's something I've always wanted to do but was always confused (me!)... :)
You stepped me through with much grace and delicacy as patience permits.
Now I can't wait for my "C" drive to fail. :)
Cheers,
Colin

Avatar
Jim Hillier
Admin
Forum Posts: 2509
Member Since:
August 9, 2011
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
26
June 3, 2014 - 4:57 pm
sp_Permalink sp_Print

Well done mate!!!!

I would maintain at least 2 images, deleting the oldest image each time you create a new one.

If only more people would make the time and effort to learn how create and restore images, there would be a lot less work for computer shops!

Glad to have been some help Colin,

Cheers... Jim

Forum Timezone: America/Indiana/Indianapolis

Most Users Ever Online: 188

Currently Online:
27 Guest(s)

Currently Browsing this Page:
1 Guest(s)

Member Stats:

Guest Posters: 10

Members: 1568

Moderators: 3

Admins: 4

Forum Stats:

Groups: 8

Forums: 19

Topics: 1646

Posts: 12365

Administrators: Jim Hillier, Richard Pedersen, David Hartsock, Marc Thomas

Moderators: Judy Novotny, Jason Shuffield, Mail Poet