Before you upload to the cloud, PEE


“The Cloud” is becoming the place to be for backup and data storage. Microsoft offers its SkyDrive; Apple has iCloud; there’s Mozy, Acronis, JustCloud, Carbonite, Dropbox, etc. There are so many, it’s impossible to list them all. This Geek uses SkyDrive, iCloud, DropBox and, for clients, Carbonite. They all have their advantages, similarities and differences. You can do your own study and make your own choices as to who you choose for your cloud storage provider; however, be aware of this very important concept: TNO – Trust No One. You want to make sure that only you, or those you designate, have access to your data. This means that:

  1. Your secret phrase, private key, PIN or password is known and visible only to you; and,
  2. Nowhere in the cloud or during transit is your data ever visible as clear text.

This is why you must PEE before you upload anything to the cloud.

PEE stands for “Pre-Egress Encryption.” In other words, encrypt your data before it ever leaves your machine. If you do this, no one will ever be able to see anything but random noise unless you allow them to decrypt it by providing the key.

Over the next couple of posts, I’ll give you a rundown of what I consider the best applications and techniques to make it easy for you to PEE. Stay tuned.

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About the Author

Ken Harthun

Ken is our resident security expert with years of experience in the field. He can also carry a tune as an accomplished musician. Ken has written for many publications and presently is a contributor to IT Knowledge Exchange.

2 Comments

  1. Suggested encryption programs would also be appreciated – classified according to ease of use and degree of security.

    Thanks,

    IG

  2. Dear Ken,
    I have another question, if that is possible. I read on the Internet to change my Windows XP pro for Windows 7 Home in the near future. My plan is to buy another hard drive, say 1TB big. Then download Windows 7 on this new hard drive, because the one I use now, is a few years old. So my C-drive I use now, becomes E or F drive or what ever. What will happen when I click on my former Windows XP hard drive?
    I can also transfer all my applications from there on my new hard drive. I use Acronis True Image HOme at the moment for backup. I use my external hard drive for this.After that I want to delete everthing on my former C-drive and use it as a spare. Can you see any problems with my ideas?

    KInd regards,

    Paulus Kruijer