100 GB OneDrive Storage Free for 2 Years


OneDrive-LogoMicrosoft is currently offering 100 GB of free storage through its OneDrive cloud service. In order to participate, you must have accounts with both Microsoft and Bing Rewards, and the storage is free for two years only.

This is sort of like the freebie you have when you’re not having a freebie. For starters, the offer is restricted to US residents only which, in this day and age of internet globalization, displays an extremely narrow view on the part of Microsoft.

Plus, what is one supposed to do with any data uploaded and stored during those two years, when the freebie expires? My guess is Microsoft is hoping many will choose to pay up in order to maintain the status quo. That is certainly an option, but what will happen to all that data if one chooses not to pay? Will it still be accessible? I seriously doubt it. Which means the only other option would be to download the data to local storage, or transfer it to another free cloud storage service, before the 2 years is up.

Hmmm

Hmmm

I am unable to take advantage of this somewhat dubious offer simply because I reside in Australia but, even if I did qualify, I would still decline due to the imposition of the two year limitation.

However, if you are a US resident and would like to take advantage of this offer; you’ll first need to create an account with Microsoft (if you haven’t done so already). You’ll then need to create an account with Bing Rewards – Microsoft’s loyalty program that rewards users for using its search engine.

Providing you do all this prior to February 28, you should see the offer for your free 100GB of OneDrive storage in the ‘Earn and Explore’ category on the Bing Rewards dashboard. To accept the reward, simply click the “Get my storage” button and agree to receive promotional e-mails from OneDrive.


 

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About the Author

Jim Hillier

Jim is the resident freeware aficionado at DCT. A computer veteran with 30+ years experience who first started writing about computers and tech back in the days when freeware was actually free. His first computer was a TRS-80 in the 1980s, he progressed through the Commodore series of computers before moving to PCs in the 1990s. Now retired (aka an old geezer), Jim retains his passion for all things tech and still enjoys building and repairing computers for a select clientele... as well as writing for DCT, of course.

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