“Read Aloud” Webpage Reader In Chromium Edge


The ”Read Aloud” feature included in Chromium Edge is a neat alternative to reading through online content, particularly articles, and instead have the content read out for you. You can change the type of voice and speed at which the content is read, and even add more voices. A terrific aid for people whose eyesight might not be the best, and a bit of fun too.

How To “Read Aloud” In Chromium Edge

Firstly, you need to enter the Immersive Reader Mode. You may or may not be aware that Chromium Edge includes a very nice feature called ”Immersive Reader Mode” which, when enabled, clears the webpage of any and all extraneous material — such as ads and links — and centers the main article presenting it in a clear, easier to read font.

Normal Mode:
edge-webpage-normal

Immersive Reader Mode:
edge-webpage-immersive-reader-mode


Immersive Reader Mode is a great way to unclutter a webpage and concentrate on what you want to read and can easily be enabled by clicking on the book icon at far right of the Address Bar:

edge-enable-immersive-reader-mode

Once in Immersive Reader Mode, move your mouse cursor toward the address bar and another toolbar will open right under the Address Bar containing several options– click the Read aloud option:

edge-enable-read-aloud

The default voice will now begin reading the content. Click the Voice options button to open a menu where you can change the speed of reading and type of voice:

edge-voice-options-menu

Once activated, the content will be read from start to finish. You can open new tabs and surf around or open an application and continue working while the content is being read in the background. At the top center of the webpage, just under the Address Bar, are controls to pause, go back, and skip forward:


edge-read-aloud-controls

Bottom Line

”Read aloud” is a new easy-to-use feature in the Chromium-based Edge which allows you to listen to any webpage content, even while working on something else. Although, my powers of concentration are such that I don’t believe I could manage that… multi-tasking not being part of my particular skill set.

Cheers… Jim

About the Author

Jim Hillier

Jim is the resident freeware aficionado at DCT. A computer veteran with 30+ years experience who first started writing about computers and tech back in the days when freeware was actually free. His first computer was a TRS-80 in the 1980s, he progressed through the Commodore series of computers before moving to PCs in the 1990s. Now retired (aka an old geezer), Jim retains his passion for all things tech and still enjoys building and repairing computers for a select clientele... as well as writing for DCT, of course.

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