Login Learner – New freeware with a mission


In these days, where advertising and profits seem to largely rule even the freeware world, it’s refreshing to encounter an example of selfless commitment where the only motivation is to provide a useful and worthwhile contribution. Such is the nature of a new freeware called Login Leaner.

The Login Learner project was born per medium of a casual inquiry posted on our recommended freeware download site FreewareBB. The scenario put forward is a common one: a preadolescent child who is struggling with math at school but who loves spending time on her laptop… sound familiar? The question that emerged: how to encourage this youngster to improve her math while still allowing quality time on the computer. The answer – a response and reward system called Login Learner.

Login Learner is simplicity personified yet ingeniously conceived. The PC is ‘locked’ until such time as the child solves a number of random problems. The number of problems and degree of difficulty can be set by the parent(s) and access to the computer’s normal functions will not be ‘unlocked’ until they have been answered correctly. Access to the program itself is password protected.

The software is still in early Beta stage and so currently not yet ready for general distribution. The developer plans on adding more and better features as development progresses, such as: multiple categories for questions,  provision for parent created questions, and stronger self-protection.

Login Learner is an innovative concept with highly commendable objectives. We’ll be keeping a close eye on Login Learner’s progress and shall continue to keep you informed of developments.

*Please bear in mind this is merely an early introduction to Login Learner and it is not yet suitable for general use. We’ll let you know as soon as it is ready, and provide a download link at that time.


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About the Author

Jim Hillier

Jim is the resident freeware aficionado at DCT. A computer veteran with 30+ years experience who first started writing about computers and tech back in the days when freeware was actually free. His first computer was a TRS-80 in the 1980s, he progressed through the Commodore series of computers before moving to PCs in the 1990s. Now retired (aka an old geezer), Jim retains his passion for all things tech and still enjoys building and repairing computers for a select clientele… as well as writing for DCT, of course.