‘Google Play’ replaces Android Market; unifies services


In a somewhat unexpected move, Google has amalgamated its previously fragmented Android eco-system into a single resource called Google Play. The announcement was made earlier today via the Official Google Blog in an article published by Jamie Rosenberg, Google’s Director of Digital Content.

From now on, all apps, music, books, movies and games are available from the one-stop Google Play.

Starting today, Android Market, Google Music and the Google eBookstore will become part of Google Play. On your Android phone or tablet, we’ll be upgrading the Android Market app to the Google Play Store app over the coming days. Your videos, books and music apps (in countries where they are available) will also be upgraded to Google Play Movies, Google Play Books and Google Play Music apps. The music, movies, books and apps you’ve purchased will continue to be available to you through Google Play—simply log in with your Google account like always.

What Google Play offers:

  • Store up to 20,000 music tracks for free and select new songs to buy from over 8 million cataloged.
  • Select from more than 450,000 Android apps and games to download
  • Browse through a selection of more than 4 million eBooks
  • Rent movies from a selection of thousands, including new releases and HD titles

Not all services are available in all countries:

In the U.S., music, movies, books and Android apps are available in Google Play. In Canada and the U.K., we’ll offer movies, books and Android apps; in Australia, books and apps; and in Japan, movies and apps. Everywhere else, Google Play will be the new home for Android apps.

Google Play HOME

About the Author

Jim Hillier

Jim is the resident freeware aficionado at DCT. A computer veteran with 30+ years experience who first started writing about computers and tech back in the days when freeware was actually free. His first computer was a TRS-80 in the 1980s, he progressed through the Commodore series of computers before moving to PCs in the 1990s. Now retired (aka an old geezer), Jim retains his passion for all things tech and still enjoys building and repairing computers for a select clientele... as well as writing for DCT, of course.