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Slide scanner
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Mindblower
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January 15, 2010 - 10:37 am
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This might not be the right spot, but I've been looking for a easy and simple way to scan slides. I have over 100, and the thought of using a MFC unit to scan 100 images and crop 'em is why I'm still waiting. Any thoughts, Mindblower!

"Light travels faster than sound;
That is why some people seem bright until you hear them speak"

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OldElmerFudd
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January 15, 2010 - 5:54 pm
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MB -
I use a dedicated slide/film scanner which I got after initially working with a unit that was part of a glorious HP 7400 scanner. The trick is to get balanced back lighting for the scan. Let me get back to you either later today or tomorrow afternoon.

Ron

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OldElmerFudd
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January 15, 2010 - 6:54 pm
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This might not be the right spot, but I've been looking for a easy and simple way to scan slides. I have over 100, and the thought of using a MFC unit to scan 100 images and crop 'em is why I'm still waiting. Any thoughts, Mindblower![/quote:ki854hzy]

A quick question or two:

A) Is a DIY solution what you need, or do you want a hardware recommendation? For the latter, I'll need to know what scanner you're using.

B) A DIY solution will require you to set your scanning software to a basic exposure/DPI level, then image editing for post processing. Unless your slides are all over the place, the most work will be physically scanning.

I'm still going ahead with a DIY solution, mostly because other readers might benefit more readily from that.

Ron

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Mindblower
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January 16, 2010 - 9:17 am
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Right now I have a scanner that's part of the Multi-Function-Unit (printer, copier, fax, etc.. an all in one unit). I have several software programs which can do the process, except they do one print, negative, slide at a time (unless I fill the scanner with several and then make multiple copies and treat each copy separately).

I'm willing to purchase hardware if this will aid in the task (under $200). I know there is an alternative, since I used this in the past, but with film. Have a lens that can hold a slide and allow the camera to take a picture. Print quality was excellent as I used good background lighting. Problem is lens is for 35mm camera.

Any more suggestions, Mindblower!

"Light travels faster than sound;
That is why some people seem bright until you hear them speak"

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OldElmerFudd
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January 16, 2010 - 10:57 am
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Right now I have a scanner that's part of the Multi-Function-Unit (printer, copier, fax, etc.. an all in one unit). I have several software programs which can do the process, except they do one print, negative, slide at a time (unless I fill the scanner with several and then make multiple copies and treat each copy separately).

I'm willing to purchase hardware if this will aid in the task (under $200). I know there is an alternative, since I used this in the past, but with film. Have a lens that can hold a slide and allow the camera to take a picture. Print quality was excellent as I used good background lighting. Problem is lens is for 35mm camera.

Any more suggestions, Mindblower![/quote:o17wxnkc]

Still working on it. Most any DIY solution is something of a kludge...what kind of camera?

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OldElmerFudd
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January 16, 2010 - 4:17 pm
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In order to scan your slides correctly, your MFC has to be able to light them from behind. There's a nice discussion of that here: (several pages) http://www.scantips.com/chap3.html
Since you already have an MFC, I hesitate to encourage you to buy something like it. My choice would be a flat bed scanner that also does film, etc. This Canon is one of the best for that: http://www.adorama.com/ICACS8800F.html However, to really get quality, I suggest a dedicated scanner. There's a great deal right now on a version of my Plustek: http://www.adorama.com/ICDP7300.html This model has a decent rebate good until the end of January 2010. The really nice thing about these Plustek scanners is the SilverFast twain driver/Photoshop plugin for print work in the post-processing stage.

Like I said before, the DIY solutions are kind of a kludge. You can always set up a camera on a tripod and run your slides through a projector. Keep it tight and try to deal with the inevitable keystoning by keeping the camera lens and the proctor lens as close to on-axis as you can. A little editing may straighten the image and return the colors close to the originals.

If quality is paramount, go with the film scanner, but you could also try the projector/camera combo first.

hth

Ron

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Mindblower
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January 16, 2010 - 5:21 pm
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Thanks for the info and links. Am I correct in that each slide will need to be individually scanned, cropped, saved, and so on using a flat bed scanner?

Taking a digital print from screen is not a good option for me. Would be better if I could mount that slide copying ;ens on a 35mm digital camera, as I have 2 adapters (screw and bayonet). Are not the lens interchangeable between film and digital cameras? Have three film cameras, plenty of lens, etc. with no need to get into digital, as the last picture I took was decades ago, Mindblower!

"Light travels faster than sound;
That is why some people seem bright until you hear them speak"

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OldElmerFudd
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January 16, 2010 - 8:47 pm
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Re using film lenses: If you have a digital SLR and the right adapters for the mount, you may be able to use your old copying lens with the camera in manual mode. Years ago, I had a two-rail bellows copier for my Nikon film SLRs; worked fine. Since my retirement, I've switched to Pentax digital SLRs because they use every Pentax lens or Pentax-mount lens made, with the same limitations about the shooting mode.

I'm a little confused; are you going to borrow a digital 35mm? Oh, and yes, using a flatbed is a one-at-a-time operation. As I said, if they have similar light values, cropping and post-processing can be done in groups, depending on your software. Frequently, creating a .bat file for the operation will tweak an entire folder of image files at once. ymmv.

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Jim Hillier
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January 17, 2010 - 7:31 pm
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Please excuse my butting in fellers, the information I am about to relate may be null and void anyway because; I know it to be correct for Oz but have no idea what may be available in Canada or the U.S.A.

Here in OZ we now have available (been on the market for around 12 months) 35mm film and slide scanners. These are stand alone devices dedicated to just those functions. They are available from the large department stores, e.g. KMart, Woollies, etc. and are generally priced around the $80.00au mark.

Here are a couple of links for similar offerings from online stores based here in Oz:
http://www.dealsdirect.com.au/p/negativ ... s-digital/
http://www.crazysales.com.au/usb-negati ... p3491.html

There are more expensive units available including the 'Plustek' range (as mentioned by Ron). I guess it boils down to the budget and any differences there may be in quality.

Cheers.....JIM

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OldElmerFudd
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January 18, 2010 - 2:19 am
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Please excuse my butting in fellers, the information I am about to relate may be null and void anyway because; I know it to be correct for Oz but have no idea what may be available in Canada or the U.S.A.

Here in OZ we now have available (been on the market for around 12 months) 35mm film and slide scanners. These are stand alone devices dedicated to just those functions. They are available from the large department stores, e.g. KMart, Woollies, etc. and are generally priced around the $80.00au mark.

Here are a couple of links for similar offerings from online stores based here in Oz:
http://www.dealsdirect.com.au/p/negativ ... s-digital/
http://www.crazysales.com.au/usb-negati ... p3491.html

There are more expensive units available including the 'Plustek' range (as mentioned by Ron). I guess it boils down to the budget and any differences there may be in quality.

Cheers.....JIM[/quote:3qtt0z5y]

Greetings!
Thanks for the input. Yes, a dedicated scanner is the best solution. That Plustek unit I mentioned works well enough, but there's minor gotchas with anything but really high-end Nikon ($2000+) scanners: time per slide. If you don't use the dust and scratch removal s/w, average scan times are about a minute and a half. Using the ISBD software, a slide can take 40 minutes! Even then, some editing is essential. I find using the Healing Brush tool in Photoshop on the digital results is great for big scratches.

Btw, those links show what appear to be unbranded VuPoint film scanners. One of the main problems with inexpensive units is poor resolution and erratic color cast issues. That's why I mentioned the more expensive solution to MB. I also have some familiarity with the product line. I bought a Plustek 7200 about three years ago to work on my slide and film library. I'm planning to upgrade to the 7600 model if I decide to use it with Windows 7. More of a thought than a plan; the 7200 works fine in XP and the 7600's about $500 USD!

Still, it's just as you say: There are times when the budget drives the choice. I remember a trip to Colorado, when I made an emergency slide copier out cardboard and tissue paper for an acquaintance. Used a little 5 MP point-and-shoot to get the slides on their computer!

Ron

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Jim Hillier
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January 18, 2010 - 4:57 am
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Hey Ron - Yes, I guess it all revolves around a prospective purchaser's level of proficiency and desired results. I bought a Canon multi function about 3 years ago which included the ability to scan 35mm film and slides. I had a bunch of slides (from an extended trip around Australia) which were around 30 years old. They came up very well but then, being strictly amateur, I am easily pleased. A professional would most likely have been horrified.....LOL.

I haven't actually seen any results achieved with the cheaper machines but my Canon was not terribly expensive so I suspect they may be comparable. I have been very happy but then, as I said, I am easily pleased.

Cheers mate.....JIM

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David Hartsock
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January 18, 2010 - 7:52 am
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I remember a trip to Colorado, when I made an emergency slide copier out cardboard and tissue paper for an acquaintance. Used a little 5 MP point-and-shoot to get the slides on their computer![/quote:3by7kuuk]

You're a regular McGyver! "Quick, give me a toilet paper roll and some tissue paper!"

I don't mean to butt in either, but would a decent camera shop offer this as a service? Might be reasonable if you have a small number of slides.

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Mindblower
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January 18, 2010 - 10:15 am
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Sorry for the confusion guys. I meant to say I have about 1,000 (not 100) slides that I'd like to convert to digital. Doing them one at a time is why I've not done so yet. Just too much time.

Saying I' have a 35mm lens, that does mean it's for SLR camera. Anything else on print film was a toy. But today, the digital fixed lens cameras have much to offer, since you can keep repeating taking a picture given the what you see finish. Oddly, most individuals who take pictures have no clue how to frame a shot. It's the point and click generation with a new toy. Technology might help some take a better picture, but odds are most don't know what a good picture looks like. I have no current interest in digital SLR cameras, but things do change. I've converted pictures to digital, and the quality actually improved (must be the monitor - as I've not made a print). Ink jet printers should not be used to print pictures as this INK runs when wet. Am told there is some special INK for ink jet printers for those who wish to print pictures and get a long live span. This is second, third hand news, no personal proof.

Guess I'll wait before trying an new venture, Mindblower!

"Light travels faster than sound;
That is why some people seem bright until you hear them speak"

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OldElmerFudd
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January 18, 2010 - 12:15 pm
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1000 slides! Your dilemma is much clearer to me now. Sounds like you have one of those nice MF Canons based on the Canoscan line. They're flatbed scanners from Canon that also do film/slides. My everyday printer is a Canon Pixmia MP610. Added a bluetooth dongle to it to print wirelessly from the lappy.

Dave's suggestion to outsource the work would be terrific if all you had were 100 slides. With a thousand, I'd seriously consider the Plustek I mentioned. With the rebate, it's a good deal and you can load 4 slides at a time in it. Automatic advance of slides doesn't start until you get to the big bucks Nikon Coolscan or Braun units. They load with 50-slide slide holders, as I recall. If these slides really matter to you, I suggest biting the bullet (I did) and commit to scanning when you have an hour or two free until the job is done. It took me about two years to scan 16,000 slides that way. Wear cotton gloves!

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carbonterry2
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May 7, 2010 - 12:21 am
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This may not be much help but several years ago I had 200+ Kodachomes I wanted to scan. I found an online service and wound up paying apprx $90 for 4000ppi scans on CD's. I'll say that the results were excellent. Now for the bad part...I can't find the name of the service I used.

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