'Cloud' based apps for Cleaning & Tweaking?

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'Cloud' based apps for Cleaning & Tweaking?
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Jim Hillier
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October 28, 2010 - 6:36 pm
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It seems the 'Cloud' is definitely the place to be at the moment, more and more cloud-based apps are hitting the airwaves.

What appears to be a relatively new developer, SlimWare, are offering two cloud based utilities; SlimComputer FREE for de-crapping new computers and SlimCleaner FREE for cleaning and optimization. Both use [i:1b80jwgx]"crowd-sourced/aggregated-cloud feedback[/i:1b80jwgx]" to do their thing.

I can't help feeling there are some areas which I would not trust to others for decision making. I know, to a certain extent, we are already doing that when using non-cloud freeware but those products are put together by 'experts' and we have an established data base of reviews, word of mouth [i:1b80jwgx]and[/i:1b80jwgx] reputation to reference.

I mean, who decides whether the advice received from mass input is coming from experts or dunces? 'Aggregate' is fine but what if there are more dunces than experts supplying the material?

Perhaps I am on the wrong track altogether. I must be, otherwise these types of apps would not be proliferating.

What do[i:1b80jwgx] you[/i:1b80jwgx] think??

Anyway...you can have a little bo peep at the SlimWare free cloud-based products on offer [url=http://www.slimwareutilities.com/products.php#a:1b80jwgx]HERE.[/url:1b80jwgx]

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OldElmerFudd
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October 30, 2010 - 1:23 am
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What appears to be a relatively new developer, SlimWare, are offering two cloud based utilities; SlimComputer FREE for de-crapping new computers and SlimCleaner FREE for cleaning and optimization. Both use [i:yc4e5k2f]"crowd-sourced/aggregated-cloud feedback[/i:yc4e5k2f]" to do their thing.[/quote:yc4e5k2f]

I've run into a couple of these cloud-based suppliers before. What puts me off is the inability to determine just how many "crowd-sourced" users have (a) responded and (b) based their feedback on a computer with the setup I have on that particular machine. There are just too many reliable softwares available - both free and commercial - that can be run locally for me to seriously consider cloud-based utilities. YMMV.

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Flying Dutchman
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October 30, 2010 - 12:57 pm
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Jim, you touch a sensitive nerve with this.

I think the "crowd-sourced/aggregated-cloud feedback" idea tries to utilize the same concept (help) forums are based on: users helping out users. The difference is that getting the right help from a (the right?) forum requires you to do some search, compare notes and possibly interact with people that seem/ sound to you as more knowledgeable than yourself. Going through this process, you learn and evolve.

Running and relying on such a crowd-sourced/aggregated-cloud feedback application carries the danger of basing your decision on what potentially less knowledgeable people say/ recommend; they don't necessarily have to be dunces, as Jim put it, it's enough they don't really understand what they're doing by clicking on buttons in a GUI (take for example Limwire, a lot of people used it with passion, but that didn't necessarily made it a wise or safe choice).

So, how can you know if the 80% or 90% of the John/ Jane Does that recommend "this" over "that" are more PC savvy than yourself? The simple answer would be "you can't". But, given that the target group are usually the intermediate and below PC savvy users (otherwise they user base wouldn't get/ be large enough to be worth the trouble, I guess) and then usually the majority of the user base are people of this knowledge level, what you know (or should) is that you can't rely on the recommendation without questioning it, at least a little bit.
So, where does this leave you? Either you go along with the recommendation, which indicates that you're not that PC savvy yourself and that maybe, if you care, one day you'll learn. Or you're too afraid or distrustful and look it up before making any changes. If you fall into the latter group, IMHO, it's more paying off if you try to understand and learn from the beginning, the knowledge you gain this way will stay with you for ever.

[quote:ie6xdist]Perhaps I am on the wrong track altogether. I must be, otherwise these types of apps would not be proliferating.[/quote:ie6xdist]
No, you're not. It's just that, there're a lot of people, even from the younger generations that were born and raised within tech advanced enviroments, that see tech devices as means to do the things they want, like or have to. "Knowing how to use something" is very different from "understanding how it works". We all start as "knowing how to use something", but people who stay in that category want a "quick fix" that doesn't require them to invest much time or energy, as that feels more like a waste than an investment to them. I think these type of apps proliferate on this sort of mentality.

[quote:ie6xdist]inability to determine just how many "crowd-sourced" users have (a) responded and (b) based their feedback on a computer with the setup I have on that particular machine.[/quote:ie6xdist]
I don't think that's something that crosses the minds of those who jump into these type of apps the moment they show up. It's not that rare that decisions are made based on convenience rather than judgement.

I got carried away, so I'll put a full stop here.

I am human

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OldElmerFudd
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October 30, 2010 - 1:53 pm
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No apologies, FD. You make a good case and a delicate rant. I also think there's many a slip in the search for "convenient" solutions, especially for problems that may not actually exist. My computer skills have been honed by 16 years of making mistakes - big ones, little ones -with PC's. I'm glad I did it that way.

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Flying Dutchman
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October 30, 2010 - 3:11 pm
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a delicate rant.[/quote:1tyxsghr]
Priceless
Never thought these two words could go together. Made a note for future use.

I am human

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OldElmerFudd
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October 30, 2010 - 3:45 pm
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YW. These thoughts come from a place I never expect to find.

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Jim Hillier
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October 30, 2010 - 5:05 pm
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Great response FD....all good points well put!!

I fully concur by the way.

I have degrees in both accountancy and commercial law but I have never officially studied computers (would that be 'computerology' ). I've been involved with the infernal machines for over 30 years now and have learned the same way as Ron....via a process of trial and error.

Made plenty of mistakes too, they can be costly at times but they also leave an indelible impression. And, as with Ron, no regrets that it panned out that way.

Cheers to both......Jim

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Flying Dutchman
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November 2, 2010 - 5:14 pm
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Hi guys,

My experience with PCs and Laptops (no Servers yet) can in no way compare to yours, but it's enough to make me state "knowledge earned through trying to make things work is knowledge earned for ever", so I fully agree with you.

As I have no professional relationship to the Computer Science sector (i.e. computerology), my motivation to invest time and effort into understanding how computers work and learning how to do things was this: I hated feeling helpless without a "tech guy" stepping in. Anything out of the ordinary used to freak me out - error messages (where can I get an interpreter?), glitches out of nowhere (or maybe not?), BSODs (is this part of Windows?), boot failures (where did Windows go?), you name it. I hated that feeling. So, I went out and got me a support team: The Internet and a good search engine.

I've still a lot to learn, but nth feels overwhelming; if it doesn't work the first time it will ... eventually, right?

I am human

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Chad Johnson
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November 3, 2010 - 9:38 am
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if it doesn't work the first time it will ... eventually, right?[/quote:r3ov9me8]

given infinite time and resources, yes.

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OldElmerFudd
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November 3, 2010 - 3:17 pm
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Well, I can hardly claim infinite time and resources, but I've generally used my machines to create product, such as documents and graphics.

My first box was a 286 or 386 (don't remember) with 4Mb of RAM and a 25Mb hard drive. After a year, I had a shop rebuild it into a PIII with 40Gb drive and more RAM. Then CD burners appeared. I bought HP's first, a 2x/4x burner for about 279.00 USD and brought it home. Then I spent about 2-3 days being terrified to open the case! These days, I frequently leave the side of cases off for easy access. Just goes to show...

Oh yeah, I still have that old burner, but only for sentimental reasons

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Jim Hillier
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November 3, 2010 - 6:21 pm
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Ron, you and I might be able to get together and start a museum for old computer components.....we would definitely have the beginnings between us.

I don't still have my original machine (a TRS-80) but I do have an old Commodore 64 and an Amiga 500 and 600 hanging around. Still got my very first printer somewhere too, an LQ dot-matrix which cost me around $499.00aud at the time. Can still recollect that relic clanking away.

Now, if anyone dares suggest that Ron and I could be considered museum pieces ourselves, I will not be amused...so kindly refain.

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OldElmerFudd
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November 3, 2010 - 7:42 pm
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Here in the States, TRS-800s had a less than complimentary nickname, but Amigas are still well thought of among certain users. My first printer was an HP that only printed in B&W. It was built like a tank, and I could refill the cartridges 6-12 times. I even bought a used printer as a backup, as they were discontinued by then.

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