Farewell Lleyton Hewitt


Yes, I know this bears no correlation whatsoever to computers or technology but I am an avid sports nut so please forgive this indulgence.

Lleyton-Hewitt-cmonFollowing a stellar career spanning 20 years and 878 matches, there is no doubt that Lleyton Hewitt has become one of Australia’s most iconic tennis legends. The little Aussie champ, the youngest male ever to be ranked #1 in the world, officially retired from pro tennis yesterday following his exit from the Australian Open at the hands of fellow warrior David Ferrer.

Love him or hate him, Lleyton has survived and prospered in a demanding and highly competitive field, and make no bones about it, the often incessant “c’mons” and fist pumping have not entirely endeared him to all Australian sports fans.

Lleyton has never been gifted with outstanding natural ability, in the vein of say a Roger Federer or Novac Djokovic, but he is undoubtedly one of the most determined and grittiest competitors of all time. And it’s that never-say-die attitude which has made him such a favorite. When any sportsman or woman manages to reach #1 in the world, it is a massive achievement, and when a sportsman such as Lleyton, who cannot match others in natural ability, reaches the pinnacle anyway based on sheer hard work and determination, one has to admire the achievement even more.

lleyton - young to old

It’s never easy comparing sporting heroes from different eras but Lleyton Hewitt’s name will surely go down in the annals of Australian sporting history. Farewell and thank you Lleyton, it’s been a thrilling ride!

FOOTNOTE:


I take umbrage at our local sports commentators who have tended to denigrate David Ferrer’s fine victory with comments such as “The old warrior (Lleyton) was beaten by a much younger man“. For the benefit of those biased and obviously ill-informed commentators – Lleyton Hewitt is 34 and David Ferrer 33. Nuff said!

 

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About the Author

Jim Hillier

Jim is the resident freeware aficionado at DCT. A computer veteran with 30+ years experience who first started writing about computers and tech back in the days when freeware was actually free. His first computer was a TRS-80 in the 1980s, he progressed through the Commodore series of computers before moving to PCs in the 1990s. Now retired (aka an old geezer), Jim retains his passion for all things tech and still enjoys building and repairing computers for a select clientele... as well as writing for DCT, of course.

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