CloudShot – Neat Screen Capture Tool


cloudshot-featureI thought I knew every type of free screen capture tool available, that was until I came across CloudShot. According to CloudShot’s changelog, the software has been around since late 2012 with the most recent version (5.1) released in March this year. Strange then that I’d never heard of it, especially seeing how it is actually a pretty neat tool.

As is the case with most free screen capture software, CloudShot’s built-in editor is fairly basic, however, it is a step above the pack in general and includes several nice sharing options plus a screen activity recorder to boot.

CloudShot – Download & Usage

CloudShot is available in both installer and portable versions, however, there is a minor caveat regarding the portable version – it does save some data in Users\UserName\AppData\Roaming\CloudShot. The installer version consists of a 3.1MB download, with the portable version weighing in at 1.8MB (zipped folder). I elected to check out the portable version – portable is always preferable, yes?

cloudshot-example

CloudShot’s capture options are accessible from a right click menu associated with its cloud-shaped system tray icon, and it also includes various hotkey combinations to initiate actions:

cloudshot-hotkeys

CloudShot Features

As I mentioned earlier, the built-in editor is fairly basic but does allow you to insert customizable text and shapes (circle, square, frame, arrow) which is probably more than adequate for most casual users. As you can see from the screenshot above, CloudShot also provides a quick and easy way to share captures through Dropbox, Imgur, and via FTP.

Unusually for freeware, CloudShot also includes a screen recorder to record screen activity. Again, it’s fairly basic and output format is limited to gif only, however, it is surprisingly effective.


cloudshot-screen-recorder

Verdict

In a genre where there are plenty of options, CloudShot is one of the easiest to use and most effective free screen capture tools I’ve tested. Well above average and definitely worth checking out.

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About the Author

Jim Hillier

Jim is the resident freeware aficionado at DCT. A computer veteran with 30+ years experience who first started writing about computers and tech back in the days when freeware was actually free. His first computer was a TRS-80 in the 1980s, he progressed through the Commodore series of computers before moving to PCs in the 1990s. Now retired (aka an old geezer), Jim retains his passion for all things tech and still enjoys building and repairing computers for a select clientele... as well as writing for DCT, of course.

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