Clean up social media permissions quickly and easily


Do you recall how many times you have granted permission for an app, something or someone to access your personal information on social sites? Do you know how to easily access your permissions page in order to find out and revoke unwanted permissions? If your answer to those questions is ‘No’ then perhaps you should take advantage of a new service offered by MyPermissions.org.

MyPermissions.org is a new site where you can quickly and easily check all your permissions across the most popular social sites. You do not need to submit any personal information or log-in details to MyPermissions, simply click on the appropriate icon and you will be taken to that site’s permissions page where you can then review a list of permissions already granted and remove any apps/websites you don’t recognize or no longer require.

I am not a social media fan but I do have a Facebook account. All my Facebook account settings are configured for maximum privacy and I do not accept any apps at all nor anything else which requires access to my personal information. So imagine my surprise when I visited my Facebook permissions page via MyPermissions.org and discovered an app called ‘Rotten Tomatoes’ had been granted permission – how, when or by who I have no idea. Needless to say, Rotten Tomatoes is now history.

All permissions are potentially risky, personal information can be utilized for identity theft as well as a plethora of other roguery. And, of course, the more people who have access to your personal information the greater the risk. So why not pop on over to MyPermissions.org right now, can’t hurt to check and you may just have a surprise or two in store.

Please feel free to let us know how you get on, what surprises you find in your permissions page.

About the Author

Jim Hillier

Jim is the resident freeware aficionado at DCT. A computer veteran with 30+ years experience who first started writing about computers and tech back in the days when freeware was actually free. His first computer was a TRS-80 in the 1980s, he progressed through the Commodore series of computers before moving to PCs in the 1990s. Now retired (aka an old geezer), Jim retains his passion for all things tech and still enjoys building and repairing computers for a select clientele… as well as writing for DCT, of course.