Captain an Awesome Starship from your own living room (video)


Kirk to Enterprise… Scott me up beamy!

starship cockpit- banner image

I just love all things outer space. You probably won’t have heard of the “Reach for the Stars” game which involved a 4×4 planetary conquest scenario and was first released for the Commodore 64 and later, somewhat disastrously, re-written for PC. Back in my Commy 64 days I would play that game for literally hours on end, practically consuming every waking hour. So I fully comprehend the gamer’s fascination with certain games.

Dedicated gamers are known to invest quite a bit of money in order to enhance their overall gaming experience but one chap in Germany has taken that to the extreme, building the ultimate rig so he can captain his very own starship.

Markus Boesen built a custom rig, inspired by the German Elite: Dangerous community, that transforms his game station into a truly amazing cockpit. With the windshield displayed across three screens using three TH681 BenQ Full HD 3D DLP projectors, the result is very realistic and truly awesome.

As well as the 3 high end displays, Mr Boesen’s ultimate rig consists of the following components:

  • A custom touch interface dashboard, comprising three Treckstor Ventos 10.1 SurfTabs running on Roccat Power-Grid software
  • VoiceAttack software to enable voice commands
  • TrackIR and Leap Motion for head tracking and gesture control respectively
  • Saitek X52 Pro HOTAS joystick and Logitech G19 keyboard
  • Crossfire2x Sapphire RADEON R9 290 Tri -X OC video card with AMD Eyefinity (resolution 5760 x 1080)
  • Logitech Z-5500 5.1 surround system

Mr. Boesen does not disclose just how much this all set him back but the math is not that hard to do… it all adds up to a lot of moolah!


Are the results worth the outlay? You be the judge:

 

 

About the Author

Jim Hillier

Jim is the resident freeware aficionado at DCT. A computer veteran with 30+ years experience who first started writing about computers and tech back in the days when freeware was actually free. His first computer was a TRS-80 in the 1980s, he progressed through the Commodore series of computers before moving to PCs in the 1990s. Now retired (aka an old geezer), Jim retains his passion for all things tech and still enjoys building and repairing computers for a select clientele... as well as writing for DCT, of course.

There are no comments

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *