4KDownload.com: Range of Portable Freeware


4k video downloaderJust recently I came across a nice range of freeware developed by a company called Open Media LLC and distributed under the “4K” banner. The software on offer is primarily orientated toward video/MP3 downloads and the two common ingredients which caught my attention are… a) portability… and… b) simplicity/ease of use. All titles are cross platform with installable versions available for Windows, Mac, and Linux (Ubuntu). Portable versions are available for Windows and Linux (Ubuntu) only.

Titles are as follows:

  • 4K Video Downloader – download video from YouTube in high-quality
  • 4K YouTube to MP3 – extract audio from YouTube, Vimeo, Facebook and other online video hosting services
  • 4K Video to MP3 – extract audio from any video
  • 4K Slideshow Maker – straightforward and easy-to-use app to create slideshows
  • 4K Stogram – Instagram client allows you to download and backup Instagram photos shared by any user

4k - software range

Minor concerns frowning smiley

*Third party reviews are somewhat scarce but I have come across user reports of unwanted bundling with some installer versions. However, I have checked through the installation process for the titles in question and found no apparent bundling myself. Also, the downloaded executables scan 100% clean through Virus Total as well as locally through Malwarebytes Anti-Malware and Avast. Of course, this concern is largely mitigated anyway if one sticks to the portable versions.

*I could not locate any definitive information regarding the company. The ‘About’ page on the 4kdownload.com site is vague with no mention of location, names, address or phone numbers. Contact details include only generic email addresses. This is not a huge issue but it does raise some questions as to why this information has not been made available.

*Two of the 4K applications, Video Downloader and YouTube to MP3, require payment to activate an additional feature. Although, as far as I can tell, absence of this feature is not a major limitation and the free versions work pretty much as advertized – my limited knowledge of YouTube Channels and Playlists doesn’t help. Here is the message associated with activation:

4k - activate

To me, that doesn’t present a major limitation. Perhaps someone more familiar with YouTube and its foibles might be kind enough to offer further insight.


*Finally, the 4K software is definitely donation orientated. Most of the main interfaces include a donation banner, and a ‘donation’ nag screen pops up occasionally with some titles. It is not overly intrusive and I have no problems with it myself, nor would it dissuade me from using the software. As I have stated many times previously, I have no problem with freeware developers attempting to generate funding via legitimate avenues.

The Positives smiling smiley

*I have tested all these applications except 4K Stogram – they all appear to work very well and as advertized. What appeals in particular is the sheer ease of use, plus the portability of course. It’s not always easy to find portable applications of this nature which are also effective.

*There are a lot of useful online ‘how-to’ guides available via a “Help” button included in each application’s interface. Not that most users should require much in the way of assistance, these applications are very easy to comprehend and use, but it’s always nice to know help is on hand if/where necessary.

*All portable Windows versions of this software scan 100% clean through Virus Total and the home site is rated Green (safe) by both WOT and McAfee SiteAdvisor.

Bottom line, would I recommend these programs? Yes; outside of the niggling doubt over the development company’s identity, I would have no qualms recommending the portable versions of this software.


Over the next couple of weeks I’ll be going into more detail with each 4K portable application individually, starting off with 4K Slideshow Maker… stay tuned!

About the Author

Jim Hillier

Jim is the resident freeware aficionado at DCT. A computer veteran with 30+ years experience who first started writing about computers and tech back in the days when freeware was actually free. His first computer was a TRS-80 in the 1980s, he progressed through the Commodore series of computers before moving to PCs in the 1990s. Now retired (aka an old geezer), Jim retains his passion for all things tech and still enjoys building and repairing computers for a select clientele... as well as writing for DCT, of course.

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