Create customized beer labels online with ‘Labeley’


Last week we received an email from a web developer who, along with some friends, has generated an online application which allows users to design and create their very own customized beer labels – at labeley.com.

It is non-flash so it works in any browser and it’s 100% free! It even works on mobile devices, so you can use your iPhone, iPad or Android gadgets to make your own custom labels. As a fellow technology enthusiast, I think you can appreciate the smoothness of the interface and the quality of the workmanship. In addition, it creates some really cool labels that are fun for posting on websites or sending to friends

I am an old home brewer from way back so I was very interested to check out the site and see for myself. I am very impressed; the online app is so easy to navigate and use, and highly configurable. The process is laid out in 5 logical, easy to follow steps and there are plenty of features and options to ensure your labels are not only highly personalized but also very professional. Label shapes, banners and borders are selectable from a good range of incorporated templates. Backgrounds, colors and fully customized text are easily applied, and images can either be added from the on-site template collection or uploaded from your hard drive for even greater personalization.

This label took about 2 minutes to put together utilizing just a few elements available in the app:

The developers are particularly emphasizing the ‘beer’ aspect but, with the high degree of customization available and a little imagination, this terrific online application could easily be utilized to create labels for just about anything.

labely.com

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About the Author

Jim Hillier

Jim is the resident freeware aficionado at DCT. A computer veteran with 30+ years experience who first started writing about computers and tech back in the days when freeware was actually free. His first computer was a TRS-80 in the 1980s, he progressed through the Commodore series of computers before moving to PCs in the 1990s. Now retired (aka an old geezer), Jim retains his passion for all things tech and still enjoys building and repairing computers for a select clientele… as well as writing for DCT, of course.